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The art of adornment

From March 30th to November 11th 2013 Rivau castle, Léméré
The art of adornment

Naji Kamouche's chain mail "Mémoire assassinée", by its title as well as by its formal composition, the work seems to respond to an intimately felt necessity: to allude, through the object, to the presence-absence of the body and to give shape to a questioning of the everyday! The oversized crown of the royal heads, Vincent Olinet's oversized crown, entitled "Notre époque a la poésie qu'elle mérite" (Our era has the poetry it deserves), evokes, not without derision, the fascination of our time for bling-bling. Another style of male headdress, "Du bonheur d'être fragile", Serena Carone's hat, all in biscuit ... not porcelain but flour.

Jacques Halbert's felt "ghost in my hat" hesitates between the genre of costume and that of vanity or perhaps it's a magician's trick : phosphorescent ghosts in a hat !

On the defence side, the hand gloved in armour and carrying the weight of the world entitled Salvatore mundi by the Flemish Jan Fabre is the counterpoint to the "Heaume cimier", decorated with a boar's headdress, imagined by the young plastic artist Astrid Méry Sinivassin.

She revisits, not without humour, the helmets worn by knights during tournaments. The hunter's parade dress in the forest is illustrated with irony by Karine Bonneval: a strange explorer "ExOurs", all in porcelain and quilted with his pencil sea urchins, bears witness to the saying "qui s'y frotte s'y piquet" (who rubs against it, pricks himself on it). Among African sorcerers, the ornament is charged with symbolism. The bearskin, revisited by Max Boufathal, represents for the artist his vision of African ceremonial jewellery. The materials, though poor, give the impression, when illuminated, of a solid gold ornament. All dressed in bolduc, this skin illustrates the artist's taste for gigantism.

A small everyday object in an extraordinary format... the gigantic ring entitled "Nikola" by the Bulgarian Stefan Nikolaev is a copy of a real jewel worn by an Orthodox priest (the artist's great-grandfather) at the time of his death, in bed, in the arms of a young woman. Symbols of the ephemeral nature of life, vanities have always adorned the intimacy of great lords, as Marnie Weber's work "Antelope" testifies. This carnivalesque animal character seems to come straight out of a burlesque and mythical universe that this singular artist conjures up in her installations.

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  • The art of adornment
  • The art of adornment
  • The art of adornment
  • The art of adornment
Karine Bonneval